Family Histories

Family Histories for the Rose and Kirkpatrick Families

Monday, November 11, 2013

Military Monday - Yerby Stroud

While researching my mother's family, I came to the William Stroud family, Irish immigrants in the mid-1700s who settled in South Carolina, along with other Protestant Scots-Irish families fleeing persecution.  William had ten children, eight of them boys, all of whom appear to have become passionate patriots during the Revolutionary War.  One of Yerby's older brothers, William, was said to have killed more Tories than any other soldier in South Carolina; he was caught by the British and hanged from a tree by the side of the road, where his body remained for three weeks as a warning to other patriots.  Eventually, a group of friends (and possibly William's mother and sister) cut his body down during the night and are said to have buried it beneath the tree.  Yerby was likely too young to fight in this war; after he married, he and his family moved from South Carolina to Henry County, Georgia, one of the first settlers of the area.  Yerby served in the War of 1812 in the 4th Regiment (Jones) Georgia Militia.  Yerby and his immediate familiy are buried at the Stroud Cemetery in Henry County, on Stroud Road. 

Stroud Cemetery

Yerby Stroud's grave

It was exciting to be within easy traveling distance to see his burial place and find other Stroud ancestors in the area, as most of my more recent ones in that line are from Arkansas and Oklahoma. 

Revolutionary War soldiers listed on monument at Catholic Presbyterian Church, Chester, SC. Includes William Stroud, and sons William, Thomas, Hampton and John.



Sunday, November 10, 2013

Sentimental Sunday - Miss Ethel Sanders and two suitors


Miss Ethel Sanders with two suitors, Mr. Gilbert Yaeger and Mr. C. A. Wooten, Helena, Arkansas, May 1895.  Mr. Yaeger won out and they were married in October 1897.