Family Histories

Family Histories for the Rose and Kirkpatrick Families

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Tombstone Tuesday: Eleanor Keys Rogers, 1812 - 1847

Eleanor Keys Rogers is my husband's 2nd great-grandmother, the first wife of Benjamin Clark Healset.  So far, Eleanor's background is a brick wall.  She married Benjamin in 1835 in Talladega, Alabama, and had their first child, Harriett, a year later.  Harriett was followed by four brothers and two sisters over the next 12 years, the youngest daughter, Martha Jane Massengale "Mat" Heaslet being my husband's great-grandmother. 

Eleanor died in July 1847, about four months after giving birth to her youngest son.  She is buried at the Old Fort William Cemetery in Talladega County.  Eleanor was just 35 at the time of her death.

Benjamin remarried a few years later and had nine more children (for a total of 16) and raised his family in Talladega.  

Trying to trace Eleanor's ancestry. to get a name for her father and mother, is proving difficult.  Even with dna helping provide some clues, I have yet to figure out who her people were.  One hint might be the middle name of Martha Jane - Massengale - a surname that I find linked with people named Rogers in the North Carolina/Tennessee/Alabama area around the time Eleanor's parents would have lived.  But even these hints have not provided any kind of map to figuring out who Eleanor's mother and father were.  I'm still very new to using dna to find ancestors, and at this point, I feel like I'm in a maze that goes nowhere. 

The search goes on and hopefully, at some point, we'll figure it out.  Martha is one of those ancestors who are said to be "part Indian," although I've found no proof of that yet; if I ever find her mother and father, we may know for sure.




1 comment:

  1. Good luck with finding Eleanor's parents. I love researching my southern lines, but oh those women can prove difficult! So sad that Eleanor died so soon after having her son and poor Benjamin facing life with a new baby and the loss of his wife. I know it's a common story during that time period, but my heart always aches for those who had to face that type of trial.

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